Recommended Interesting Articles

Drawing

Drawing Basics: Get In That Box!

Head of 12-year-old Christ by Albrecht Dürer,drawing, 1506.Adapted from an article by Dan Gheno.As you know from my previous blog about needing a GPS to draw heads–because I get more lost in the eyes, ears, mouth, and nose than youd think would ever be possible–I am on the lookout for any kind of aid or tricks or artistic voodoo that can set me on the right path.
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Techniques and Tips

Technique: Design Aesthetic

How theatre set design, an eye for detail, and the study of historical traditions and transitions can inform composition in painting and drawing.by Ray RizzoFor his class on the history of costume and decor, New York artist and educator Lowell Detweiler has developed a specific approach to the study of interiors.
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Techniques and Tips

Attaching canvas to board

Q. I’ve been doing a lot of plein air painting on pieces of canvas stapled to 1/2-inch thick foam board. Now I want to mount them on hardboard panels and then trim the edges. Does the panel need to be primed before I apply the adhesive? What would be the best adhesive to use for attaching the canvas to the boards?
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Techniques and Tips

Pastel QA | Fixing a Moldy Pastel

Q. I live in a very humid climate, and I have a pastel painting framed with Plexiglas that’s developed mold. How can I remove the mold without damaging the painting?A. Tom Komala, a pastel artist and art conservator in Denver, says, “If it’s an old or valuable painting, I’d take it to an art conservator who has knowledge of restoring works on paper.
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Drawing

Like Breath on Glass: Whistler, Inness, and the Art of Painting Softly

A softer style of landscape painting that emerged during the turn of the century, made popular by James Abbott McNeill Whistler and George Inness.by Allison MalafronteMoonlight Landscapeby Edward Steichen, 1903, oil, 24 x 25. Collection Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts.Around the turn of the 20th century there was a new approach to landscape painting made popular by James Abbott McNeill Whistler (1834-1903) and George Inness (1825-1894) that used thin veils of paint to create soft, tonalist effects that hid the evidence of the artist’s hand.
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Techniques and Tips

Essential Watercolor Painting Techniques: Wet-into-Wet

We have a great lesson on watercolor painting for you today, excerpted from Joe Garcia’s Secrets of Watercolor – From Basics to Special Effects, watercolor painting techniques, including wet-into-wet, which we’re going to share with you, today. This great little book takes some of Joe’s best lessons and distills them down into the essentials that every watercolor artist should know.
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